Speech Therapy

(715) 478-4344
Monday – Thursday
7am – 5pm

Services Provided:

  • Treat Typical Communication Disorders
  • Stuttering
  • Aphasia
  • Language / Articulation / Voice Disorders
  • Cognitive Communication Disorders
  • Swallowing Disorders

Speech Therapy Header

Did You Know?

  • Well Child visits. Your pediatrician will ask specific questions in order to monitor your child’s speech and language development. If your pediatrician has concerns, a referral to a Speech-Language Pathologist will be made.
  • If you have any concerns between well child visits, contact your pediatrician for a visit. Your pediatrician is not only concerned about your child’s medical health, but also their development in all areas.
  • If you have definite concerns related to speech or language development, it is okay to call your physician or pediatrician and request a referral to a Speech-Language Pathologist. They may or may not want to see you for an office visit prior to making the referral.
  • Speech pathologists treat patients of all ages and will see some clients in their own home environment.

boy with dog

I have the referral, now what?

At the initial evaluation, the Speech-Language Pathologist will evaluate your child’s expressive and receptive language using:

  • Standardized Testing
  • Parent/Caregiver Interview
  • Observation

This may be done in your home, daycare, or at the FCP-Health and Wellness Center. Results will be shared with you, recommendations will be made, and a treatment plan will be established with you. A copy of the evaluation will be sent to your child’s pediatrician. For young children, most speech therapy is play-based and parent/ caregiver centered to keep the child’s attention, help them feel secure, and teach the caregiver how to continue working with the child.

Speech Therapy Header

Did You Know?

  • Well Child visits. Your pediatrician will ask specific questions in order to monitor your child’s speech and language development. If your pediatrician has concerns, a referral to a Speech-Language Pathologist will be made.
  • If you have any concerns between well child visits, contact your pediatrician for a visit. Your pediatrician is not only concerned about your child’s medical health, but also their development in all areas.
  • If you have definite concerns related to speech or language development, it is okay to call your physician or pediatrician and request a referral to a Speech-Language Pathologist. They may or may not want to see you for an office visit prior to making the referral.
  • Speech pathologists treat patients of all ages and will see some clients in their own home environment.

Services Provided:

  • Treat Typical Communication Disorders
  • Stuttering
  • Aphasia
  • Language / Articulation / Voice Disorders
  • Cognitive Communication Disorders
  • Swallowing Disorders

boy with dog

I have the referral, now what?

At the initial evaluation, the Speech-Language Pathologist will evaluate your child’s expressive and receptive language using:

  • Standardized Testing
  • Parent/Caregiver Interview
  • Observation

This may be done in your home, daycare, or at the FCP-Health and Wellness Center. Results will be shared with you, recommendations will be made, and a treatment plan will be established with you. A copy of the evaluation will be sent to your child’s pediatrician. For young children, most speech therapy is play-based and parent/ caregiver centered to keep the child’s attention, help them feel secure, and teach the caregiver how to continue working with the child.

Activities to Encourage Language Development

The importance of playing with our children, reading to them, and providing a language-rich environment cannot be stressed enough. Here are some tips to help your child learn to communicate.

  • Practice OWL-ing to encourage good communication skills (Hanen, 1983)
    • Observe: Learn to recognize your child’s feelings and needs
    • Wait: Allow your child to lead the activity and wait for their natural response to events that take place. This gives your child a chance to express in his/her own way.
    • Listen: We want to provide a good model of language to our children, but we also need to give them space to talk.
  • Ask your child “Wh” questions rather than Yes/No questions.
  • Put favorite toys or foods out of reach so your child must ask for them. Set the expectation that language is an important tool to have your wants fulfilled.
  • Sing silly songs and read nursery rhymes with your child, children love the rhythm and repe ve nature of nursery rhymes. Once your child is familiar with the nursery rhyme or favorite book, see if he or she can ll in the rest of a sentence from memory.
  • Make silly faces in the mirror with your baby, toddler, or small child. This encourages eye contact, social, and language development.
  • Practice making animal sounds together while looking at and talking about animals in a book or in real-life.
  • Encourage pretend play by joining in with your child. You may feel silly, but your child will have fun and learn from you at the same me.

Speech Therapy

(715) 478-4344
Monday – Thursday 7am – 5pm


8201 Mish ko swen Drive
Crandon, WI 54520